Dervish

Dervish, Darvesh, or Darwīsh (from Persian: درویش, Darvīsh) in Islam can refer broadly to members of a Sufi fraternity (tariqah), or more narrowly to a religious mendicant, who chose or accepted material poverty. The latter usage is found particularly in Persian and Turkish (Derviş), corresponding to the Arabic term faqīr. Their focus is on the universal values of love and service, deserting the illusions of ego to reach God. In most Sufi orders, a dervish is known to practice dhikr through physical exertions or religious practices to attain the ecstatic trance to reach God. Their most common practice is Sama, which is associated with the 13th-century mystic Rumi. In folklore, dervishes are often credited with the ability to perform miracles and ascribed supernatural powers.