nullary

In logic, mathematics, and computer science, the arity of a function or operation is the number of arguments or operands the function or operation accepts. The arity of a relation (or predicate) is the dimension of the domain in the corresponding Cartesian product. (A function of arity n thus has arity n+1 considered as a relation.) The term springs from words like unary, binary, ternary, etc. Unary functions or predicates may be also called “monadic”; similarly, binary functions may be called “dyadic”. In mathematics arity may also be named rank, but this word can have many other meanings in mathematics. In logic and philosophy, arity is also called adicity and degree. In linguistics, arity is usually named valency. In computer programming, there is often a syntactical distinction between operators and functions; syntactical operators usually have arity 0, 1, or 2. Functions vary widely in the number of arguments, though large numbers can become unwieldy. Some programming languages also offer support for variadic functions, i.e. functions syntactically accepting a variable number of arguments.